20 ways to treat yourself like a child and be happier

September 6, 2017 By inquisitiveart

When you treat someone like a child it usually means that you’re being condescending, patronizing, or otherwise obnoxious. Sometimes though treating yourself, like a child can be a good thing. Or even great!

Maybe I’m just not great at taking care of myself, but I know that when I am responsible for a kid I take care of them a lot better than I do myself! And when I am indecisive or lazy about caring for myself or doing something I should, it often helps to ask myself “What if I were a child? What would I do for myself?”.

This way of thinking helps me prioritize, be healthier, and be kinder to myself and I think it could help you too!

Here’s twenty examples of how treating myself like a child makes me happier:

  1. Listen to your body when you are hungry and thirsty

    I would never let a child go hungry just because I am busy or too lazy to make a meal! Why do I ignore my own body when I want food? I also am diligent about making my nephew drink enough water when I’m watching him on a hot day. The least I can do for myself is to have a drink now and then. The “Plant Nanny” app is free and has also been helping me get enough water lately. Without it I usually end up ignoring water until late at night and then drinking a ton right before bed.

What’s the point of art? Is it really that important in our lives?

August 28, 2017 By inquisitiveart

What’s the point of art?

There’s my whole blog here, not to mention universities, cultural movements, museums, entire lives, and who knows what else-all dedicated to art. Sometimes it makes me wonder:

What’s the point? What is the point of art, and is it really that important?

Cesar A. Cruz said:

“Art should comfort the disturb and disturb the comfortable.”

So, done. All figured out. Thank you Cesar for clearing that up.

The only problem is figuring out what in the world he meant, and if we even agree with him.

So first off:

Art should comfort the disturbed…”

Comforting the disturbed seems like a pretty worthwhile goal.

I’ve bonded with friends over movies, been refreshed by a beautiful graphic novel, been encouraged by adventurous novels, and was inspired by gorgeous art and mind-blowing sci fi.

I’d say that, yes, art has definitely comforted me when I was disturbed.

And not just me, art has also been a huge part of social movements throughout history and has been used to comfort/encourage/inspire those suffering through horrible experiences.

When people are scared or hurt some of them always reach out to each other with art.

You can look on Instagram right now and see that every recent tragedy has people trying to process it and show how they care about others through whatever medium they use.

Am I In Over My Head?

August 25, 2017 By inquisitiveart

Am I in over my head?

 

Yes.

 

Of course I am.

 

Perhaps I took my own advice on “Making My Life Harder on Purpose” a little too well.

 

I’ve committed to becoming a professional illustrator.

 

To those who know me well, this might feel more “out of the blue” than it is.

 

Backing up a bit

 

I’ve always loved art and thought about going to art school after high school…but didn’t.

 

After graduating with my teaching certification I taught 5th grade, and let’s just be kind and say I had a bit of a rough year. I loved parts of it, but ultimately realized that classroom teaching wasn’t for me.

 

While surviving 5th grade, I started to draw more frequently and focused more on improving while I thought seriously about the foolishness of changing careers right after spending years getting a teaching degree.

 

Then came nine months of working overseas and traveling as a “break”, “while I could” before I “got too settled” into a teaching job.

 

Which were all true reasons for why I went overseas.

How challenging yourself creatively can change your life

How challenging yourself creatively can change your life

July 9, 2017 By inquisitiveart

My life was too easy. So I fixed it.

If you haven’t already read about why I intentionally make my life harder-check it out HERE.

Now that you understand why you should CHALLENGE yourself, I’m gonna try to convince you to challenge yourself CREATIVELY.

By that I mean, challenge yourself to actively create new things! Drawings, paintings, poems, sculptures, fancy sweaters, wooden shoes, gourmet dog treats, whatever! The point is that you are using your imagination to create something that no one has seen before, to create art.

It’s important for everyone to work on some type of art, whatever your occupation because:

  1. Art = self expression

The more you create and explore new possibilities the better you get at expressing and understanding yourself. You bit by bit develop a larger toolbox for creating messages, getting your point across, exploring and learning about what you personally find important, and connecting with others.

2. Art = understanding and empathy

As you explore more of what is interesting and important to you-focusing on the patterns in a bird’s wing you’re painting, exploring how different glazes blend on your pottery, trying out new patterns for crochet-you express yourself and other learn to better understand other artists and people. Art is a large part of culture, it expresses your unique priorities, but can also communicate what a society deems important.

Why I Torture Myself- And Why You Should Too!

Why I Torture Myself- And Why You Should Too!

July 9, 2017 By inquisitiveart

This entire blog is a testament to me making my life harder, and more complicated then it needs to be.

I could just enjoy creating art! Why force myself to draw things I’m bad at? Study the history? Practice a skill so much I’m sick of it and can teach it to others without thinking?

I could just keep it to myself! Why face potential critism and embaressment by sharing my ugly, beginner art with strangers and, even worse, people I actually know?

I could at least set less ridiculous goals and only post after I’ve improved! Why rush to improve? Why not go slow and wait a few weeks, or years, until I’m already a master?

The answer to all of that is that art, and life, is better when you have to struggle a little.

I mean this within reason of course. I personally know the pain of having too much stress and not knowing if you can handle it. Not wanting to go to work in the morning because you know you’ll just end up failing again. Crying in the car on the way to work, dreading another day of unmet (largely self-imposed) expectations.

Just me?

Anyway…

Too much stress and too high of expectations is clearly NOT desirable.

But neither is too little.

I challenge myself artistically because:

  1. Life is better with (reasonable) challenges
  2. Improving artistically has it’s own amazing benefits (for me,
How Do I (re)Start?

How Do I (re)Start?

July 7, 2017 By inquisitiveart

I didn’t realize how much momentum I had until I lost it.
I was working hard pushing a rock along without realizing how well it was going. And then I stopped for too long and now I’m just staring at a brick wall and wondering how much running straight into it will hurt. 
And how embarrased I should be about needing to restart. Again. 
Well this is me. Running into the brick wall/boulder face first. Hoping it will start moving again and not sure what it’ll look like when it does. 
I honestly love this writing/blogging a lot more than I though I would. I always saw myself as a “super visual” person and not as good with words. Sure I could write what teacher’s wanted and do well on essays-but creative writing? Writing for fun? Nah man. That’s like talking. And I’m clearly not good at that. Plus, I’m SUPER VISUAL! I’d rather read the text than watch a youtube video of someone talking-doesn’t that mean I should stick to the more visual side of things? 
But surprisingly writing and doing art tutorials has been so great. I felt like I had found this whole new way to express myself and connect with others. So it’s more frustrating that I just, kinda, gave up on it. 
Life happened. And kept happening. And is STILL happening. 
First, I thought that I would be able to do more writing and work as soon as I was back in the US and not traveling. 

How Do I (re)Start?

How Do I (re)Start?

July 7, 2017 By inquisitiveart

I didn’t realize how much momentum I had until I lost it.
I was working hard pushing a rock along without realizing how well it was going. And then I stopped for too long and now I’m just staring at a brick wall and wondering how much running straight into it will hurt. 
And how embarrased I should be about needing to restart. Again. 
Well this is me. Running into the brick wall/boulder face first. Hoping it will start moving again and not sure what it’ll look like when it does. 
I honestly love this writing/blogging a lot more than I though I would. I always saw myself as a “super visual” person and not as good with words. Sure I could write what teacher’s wanted and do well on essays-but creative writing? Writing for fun? Nah man. That’s like talking. And I’m clearly not good at that. Plus, I’m SUPER VISUAL! I’d rather read the text than watch a youtube video of someone talking-doesn’t that mean I should stick to the more visual side of things? 
But surprisingly writing and doing art tutorials has been so great. I felt like I had found this whole new way to express myself and connect with others. So it’s more frustrating that I just, kinda, gave up on it. 
Life happened. And kept happening. And is STILL happening. 
First, I thought that I would be able to do more writing and work as soon as I was back in the US and not traveling. 

How to Draw in 3-Point Perspective

How to Draw in 3-Point Perspective

May 12, 2017 By inquisitiveart

3-point perspective isn’t used as frequently as the others-but can add a lot of drama and emphasis when drawing a huge building or tree stretching off into the sky. It is similar to 2-point perspective, but the third vanishing point shows where the object dissappears into the distance above.

Step one: As always, put down your horizon line and vanishing points. Two will be on the horizon line somewhere, but the third should be above or below it.

Leave yourself lots of space between the third VP and the horizon line to make it easier.

 

Next, draw one line from your top vanishing point down. This will be the closest edge of your building.

Then, you can add two dots to mark the top and bottom of the building. Connect each dot to each of the vanishing points on the side.

After that, mark where you want the bottom corners of the building to be. I added little arrows. Draw a line from each spot up to the top vanishing point.

That’s basically it. Details on the side with slope upwards towards the top VP, and along each side with angle towards the VP on their respective side.

I’ve added a sketch of what it can look like with you add more surrounding buildings.  And here’s a more subtle example with all three vanishing points off the page. 

Artemisia Gentileschi: The Most Bad-A** Renaissance Artist You’ve Never Heard Of

Artemisia Gentileschi: The Most Bad-A** Renaissance Artist You’ve Never Heard Of

May 2, 2017 By inquisitiveart

Fierce, beautiful, unrelenting, unsettling.

Those words can be used to describe both Artemisia and her art. And indeed, it seems impossible to separate the two.

Artemisia Gentileschi was a focused and passionate artist who was trained and encouraged by her artist father (one of few ways a women could receive professional training at the time) and as a teenager was known to spend most of her time devoted to painting. While her father’s support enabled her artistic education, it was her own passion and drive that lead to several unbelievable masterpieces before she even turned twenty.

Artemisia brought strength, boldness, and realism to the women in her paintings-while also bringing to light the darker realities that male artists often ignored.

One of her first well-known pieces shows “Susanna and the Elders”. Other artists portrayed the Elders as far-off and subtle peeping-toms and Susanna as an unaware beauty that they, and the artist/audience, could gaze at without consequences. Artemisia on the other hand portrayed the men shamelessly ogling Susanna, with Susanna aware, uncomfortable, and afraid. Artemisia likely drew upon her own experiences at the time of the unwanted advances and leering gazes of her painting tutor Tassi and his friend to reveal how disgusting the story, and intrusion of privacy, really was.

That unwanted attention from her painting tutor sadly didn’t stop. Tassi eventually raped Artemisia and was sued by her father. The 7-month long public court case resulted in Artemisia being literally tortured to see if her testimony was true (Tassi was unharmed),

How to draw in 2-point perspective 

April 26, 2017 By inquisitiveart

Drawing in 2-point perspective is a lot like 1-point except, you guessed it, you have two vanishing points instead of one. 

First, start with your horizon line and add your two vanishing points. 


Then, you add the vertical edge of whatever you’re drawing. (In my case, delicious cereal 🙂 ) In two point perspective both sides are sloping towards a vanishing points, so you can’t draw the closest side “flat” like before. 


Next, draw lines connecting the top and bottom of your vertical line to each vanishing point. 


The final step, is to use parallel lines to the center (in this case vertical) to “cut off” each side. Then you can erase extra lines and add details. I used more guidelines to get the words on the front of the box straight. 


That cereal box didn’t have a visible top or bottom, which made it a bit easier. I added a box of tea so you can see how to do the top. 


You do the same things as with any other 2-point perspective drawing, but after you “cut off” the sides you need to add a top. I did this by going from each of the top corners to the vanishing point in the opposite side of the page. 


I added extra guidelines to the tea so that you can see how to add words or details on the sides.